Strategy based on players

NYCRyNYCRy Red Chipper Posts: 336 ✭✭✭
In live cash are you tending to stay away from good/laggy/thinking/aggro players in the game or do you try to be the best player at the table every time, playing back at anyone regardless?

Comments

  • YoshYosh Red Chipper Posts: 580 ✭✭✭
    If you don't attack these players your game will stagnate, and they will attack you.
  • moishetreatsmoishetreats Red Chipper Posts: 1,819 ✭✭✭✭
    The question isn't "Do you stay away from them?" but rather "How do you gain an edge over / beat them?"
  • ChipFluxChipFlux Red Chipper Posts: 89 ✭✭
    When at the table, I don't concern myself with trying to best or play back at certain players as an end unto itself. Rather, I try to make the best decision in each spot while, of course, understanding the game I'm sitting and the styles, tendencies, and capabilities of each of the players and how to best proceed in certain spots involving them. I am seldom the defacto best player at a particular table, but the better players and I usually recognize each other during the course of play. Paraphrasing from Rounders "piranhas don't eat each other". I don't go out of my way to avoid players, but I definitely look to exploit those players who I perceive to be exploitable. To extend the piranha analogy, I don't try to eat all the bait, but I don't let others feast while I starve, either.
  • NYCRyNYCRy Red Chipper Posts: 336 ✭✭✭
    ChipFlux wrote: »
    When at the table, I don't concern myself with trying to best or play back at certain players as an end unto itself. Rather, I try to make the best decision in each spot while, of course, understanding the game I'm sitting and the styles, tendencies, and capabilities of each of the players and how to best proceed in certain spots involving them. I am seldom the defacto best player at a particular table, but the better players and I usually recognize each other during the course of play. Paraphrasing from Rounders "piranhas don't eat each other". I don't go out of my way to avoid players, but I definitely look to exploit those players who I perceive to be exploitable. To extend the piranha analogy, I don't try to eat all the bait, but I don't let others feast while I starve, either.

    This is pretty much my exact current strategy in the game I've been frequenting. Thanks for sharing.
  • persuadeopersuadeo Red Chipper, Table Captain Posts: 4,085 ✭✭✭✭✭
    It is easy to overlook the moral lesson of Rounders because of that famous line: Mike ceased being just a pirhana, unlike Worm and the other ne'er do wells, took on Chan as a personal challenge and finally KGB, allowing him to continue on his personal quest for greatness.
  • EazzyEazzy Red Chipper Posts: 969 ✭✭✭✭
    Two me its all about control. The more control I have over a player the more I want to play them. When I see a player I consider a Lag or Tag... I try to see how they play certain types of hands...

    The more I understand how the act on threat cards....how if the double and triple barrel. How they deal with draws, how thin the value bet the river.... type thing... the more I want to play with them.

    That is I look for patterns that I can exploit...once I think I've found one or two I play a lot of hands with them, until then I tend to get out of their way.
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,746 ✭✭✭✭✭
    It's easy to bottom out on either side of the see saw. Neither do you want to always avoid better players, as you'll slowly bleed out that way, nor do you want to constantly clash with them in a testosterone soaked cage match. Read Sun Tzu and I think you'll find good balance between attack, defense, and merely waiting. You have to balance between avoiding engagement when things seem unclear, and making things unclear for your opponent, which requires engagement.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file