Where to start?

MediocreDegenerateMediocreDegenerate Red Chipper Posts: 16 ✭✭
I have an interesting challenge for the coaches/forum members.

My 18 year old son who has high functioning Autism wants to learn how to play poker because he is frustrated trying to find and keep a job with the limitations caused by his condition. Honestly due to how his autism affects him live poker is out of the question.

Just trying to figure out the best way to teach him.

The autism creates some unique strengths and some weaknesses that include

Strengths –

Does not get bored ever (He will literally sit and do the same thing over and over and never get bored.

Follows rules religiously (If I gave him a preflop hand chart he would always play by it with no deviations)

Good with simple math

Good with objective facts

Would not be affected by tilt

Weaknesses -

Follows rules religiously (If I gave him a preflop hand chart he would always play by it with no deviations)

Does not understand or even notice subjective information.

His processing speed can be slow

He can get overwhelmed without a step by step "system to work to a decision.

Comments

  • AustinAustin Red Chipper Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Why not start him out online? Give him some books or software to use. Even pokerstars play money, see if he can climb the play money stakes to the top.
  • EazzyEazzy Red Chipper Posts: 969 ✭✭✭✭
    edited June 2018
    It sounds like your son has all the advantages and disavantages of being a computer program.

    Thus you have to write him an algorithm. start simple here is a fixed starting hand chart. This type of hand with this spr do this.....type thing. Make it pretty simple at the beginning.

    Then Add in a HUD. Against stats like this, then use this set of rules. Probably starting out short stacking multi tables would be the easiest way as this tends to be an easier rule based game to beat.

    Alternately, you could develop a set of rules based on a Game Theroy optimal type models. Though not hugely effective at low stakes (exploitative poker is way better IMO) these models do tend to lead to a fixed set of rules. Something like Ed Millers 1% rules, would take work by you, but the rules are being developed, Splits series on the 1% probaqbly gives a good beginning fora set of rules that you might be able to adapt to teach your son.

    Eventually moving towards, a more sophisticated true GTO approach. As GTO for poker gets solved your son would be an ideal player to implement it,.

    The advantage of a GTO type approach, is that your son would not have to adapt to the rules to new environments. If you do an exploitative style you would have to monitor the games, and change the rules as you see the games change.

  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 2,388 -
    Great advice here. Let me add that there are many successful poker players on the Autism spectrum. As the OP implies there are definite advantages to play a game which by nature is repetitive. (ADD and OCD are also quite common.)

    Not noticing subjective information would obviously be an issue in a live setting, but online with a HUD I doubt this would be a stumbling block. At some level online poker is just a dynamic math problem.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • AustinAustin Red Chipper Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭✭✭
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    Great advice here. Let me add that there are many successful poker players on the Autism spectrum. As the OP implies there are definite advantages to play a game which by nature is repetitive. (ADD and OCD are also quite common.)

    Not noticing subjective information would obviously be an issue in a live setting, but online with a HUD I doubt this would be a stumbling block. At some level online poker is just a dynamic math problem.

    I thought ignition would be a great place to start. Players are unknown, fast pace, and good spot for some basic preflop play. Can be a robotic type strategy of say 15-20% range preflop.
  • MediocreDegenerateMediocreDegenerate Red Chipper Posts: 16 ✭✭
    So we downloaded stars play money and he is instinctively playing right. Which is good. I just signed him up on core to try and help him learn.
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 2,388 -
    Best of luck to both of you.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • kageykagey Red Chipper, KINGOFTAGS Posts: 2,241 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I'd work with him using SplitSuits books.
    Knowing ranges and how they affect the decisions we make is huge.

    agree that encouraging him to play online is best...
  • AustinAustin Red Chipper Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Poker Snowie cost a couple hundred (annually), but you can learn ranges and bet sizing for SNG or cash games. After your son is beating Snowie or has a good grasp, turn him loose on the micro players for real money.
  • MediocreDegenerateMediocreDegenerate Red Chipper Posts: 16 ✭✭
    Austin wrote: »
    Poker Snowie cost a couple hundred (annually), but you can learn ranges and bet sizing for SNG or cash games. After your son is beating Snowie or has a good grasp, turn him loose on the micro players for real money.

    I was looking at pokersnowie and plan on using it once I get him to understand and grasp what some of the concepts are...

    Last night I spent about 2hours explaining pot odds and equity... Being the spectrum makes it hard for him to understand a lot of things at first. However, once he gets them he wont forget.
  • AustinAustin Red Chipper Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Austin wrote: »
    Poker Snowie cost a couple hundred (annually), but you can learn ranges and bet sizing for SNG or cash games. After your son is beating Snowie or has a good grasp, turn him loose on the micro players for real money.

    I was looking at pokersnowie and plan on using it once I get him to understand and grasp what some of the concepts are...

    Last night I spent about 2hours explaining pot odds and equity... Being the spectrum makes it hard for him to understand a lot of things at first. However, once he gets them he wont forget.

    A book recommended by @kenaces to me is "Advanced NL Concepts" by Hunter Cichy. This book uses PokerSnowie has a foundation. I don't think its the best book in the world by any means, but there is quite a bit to take out of it still. Hunter also has some videos to go a long with it. I think the book was written too fast and mistakes were made in the book that are incorrect. For example he talks about $5/$10 games where the (Hero) button raises to $30, BB calls. Flop ($60) Ah 6h 2c BB checks, hero bets $30 and BB raises to $90. Hunter states with a FD you are getting "2 : 1." He does not take into account the size of the pot and your actually getting 3:1 in this spot calling $60 to win $180. These technical error occurs over and over again in his check raise section of the book. Despite the errors I think its still a good book to pick up as it's one of the modern books.

    Another part of the book I don't like is in the beginning with some of the preflop charts. Hunter uses snap shots of pokersnowie recommendations, but then states he would use a wider range for value or drop off some of the Axs bluffs. I think this was pretty lazy and he should just make his own chart instead of the reader trying to fill in the blanks to what he is saying.

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