Do you use math in high stakes?

AustinAustin Red Chipper Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭✭✭


Hand starts at 27:40

$400-$800-$1600
Co Newey opens $4500
Btn folds
SB matt kirk (293k) raise to 18k
BB Robl (1.5M) cold 4bet 50K
Co folds
Kirk 5bet to 100k
Robl calls 50k

Flop ($207,700) :2s :2c :7c
Kirk (193k) bet 35k
Robl calls 35k
Turn ($277,700) :Ah
Kirk (158k) bets $50k
Robl all in
you wanna know what happens? Watch the hand!

Comments

  • RedRed Red Chipper Posts: 1,786 ✭✭✭✭
    You miss to tell us / others, that Kirk is a crazy maniac. This change a lot on how understanding the hand and ranges in play.

    ThePokerGuys broke the hand down years ago too
  • persuadeopersuadeo Red Chipper, Table Captain Posts: 3,773 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Robl probably uses more math than most anyone, certainly here. That doesn't mean he's forgotten how to actually play his opponent. We're in an age of very unimaginative players who need a sim to tell them what to do, but Robl arrived well before them, giving him the benefit of much experience when it comes to the actual game.
  • kenaceskenaces Red Chipper Posts: 1,382 ✭✭✭✭
    persuadeo wrote: »
    Robl probably uses more math than most anyone, certainly here. That doesn't mean he's forgotten how to actually play his opponent. We're in an age of very unimaginative players who need a sim to tell them what to do, but Robl arrived well before them, giving him the benefit of much experience when it comes to the actual game.

    I don't think the study of GTO means necessarily makes one unimaginative. Having a deep understanding of the game can help one think and play creatively when the opportunity presents itself.

    I do agree that 10+ years of high level poker experience is a big advantage.
  • persuadeopersuadeo Red Chipper, Table Captain Posts: 3,773 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • kenaceskenaces Red Chipper Posts: 1,382 ✭✭✭✭
  • persuadeopersuadeo Red Chipper, Table Captain Posts: 3,773 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't think the study of GTO means necessarily makes one unimaginative.
  • Christian SotoChristian Soto RCP Coach Posts: 2,192 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2018
    kenaces wrote: »
    persuadeo wrote: »
    Robl probably uses more math than most anyone, certainly here. That doesn't mean he's forgotten how to actually play his opponent. We're in an age of very unimaginative players who need a sim to tell them what to do, but Robl arrived well before them, giving him the benefit of much experience when it comes to the actual game.

    I don't think the study of GTO means necessarily makes one unimaginative. Having a deep understanding of the game can help one think and play creatively when the opportunity presents itself.

    I do agree that 10+ years of high level poker experience is a big advantage.

    I think the majority of what I would call GTO players have little to no creativity because they are not confident enough in their ability to correctly find the deviation.
  • kenaceskenaces Red Chipper Posts: 1,382 ✭✭✭✭
    kenaces wrote: »
    persuadeo wrote: »
    Robl probably uses more math than most anyone, certainly here. That doesn't mean he's forgotten how to actually play his opponent. We're in an age of very unimaginative players who need a sim to tell them what to do, but Robl arrived well before them, giving him the benefit of much experience when it comes to the actual game.

    I don't think the study of GTO means necessarily makes one unimaginative. Having a deep understanding of the game can help one think and play creatively when the opportunity presents itself.

    I do agree that 10+ years of high level poker experience is a big advantage.

    I think the majority of what I would call GTO players have little to no creativity because they are not confident enough in their ability to correctly find the deviation.

    I think you are making a big assumption.
  • AustinAustin Red Chipper Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think GTO players in live high stakes can be creative. Online I feel they stick to GTO style. I give my opponents respect until I know other wise.
  • Christian SotoChristian Soto RCP Coach Posts: 2,192 ✭✭✭✭
    kenaces wrote: »
    kenaces wrote: »
    persuadeo wrote: »
    Robl probably uses more math than most anyone, certainly here. That doesn't mean he's forgotten how to actually play his opponent. We're in an age of very unimaginative players who need a sim to tell them what to do, but Robl arrived well before them, giving him the benefit of much experience when it comes to the actual game.

    I don't think the study of GTO means necessarily makes one unimaginative. Having a deep understanding of the game can help one think and play creatively when the opportunity presents itself.

    I do agree that 10+ years of high level poker experience is a big advantage.

    I think the majority of what I would call GTO players have little to no creativity because they are not confident enough in their ability to correctly find the deviation.

    I think you are making a big assumption.

    I am, but would you argue that Jungleman or Haxton have a creative bone? Those are the best of that camp and what that camp wants to become.
  • AustinAustin Red Chipper Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭✭✭
    kenaces wrote: »
    kenaces wrote: »
    persuadeo wrote: »
    Robl probably uses more math than most anyone, certainly here. That doesn't mean he's forgotten how to actually play his opponent. We're in an age of very unimaginative players who need a sim to tell them what to do, but Robl arrived well before them, giving him the benefit of much experience when it comes to the actual game.

    I don't think the study of GTO means necessarily makes one unimaginative. Having a deep understanding of the game can help one think and play creatively when the opportunity presents itself.

    I do agree that 10+ years of high level poker experience is a big advantage.

    I think the majority of what I would call GTO players have little to no creativity because they are not confident enough in their ability to correctly find the deviation.

    I think you are making a big assumption.

    I am, but would you argue that Jungleman or Haxton have a creative bone? Those are the best of that camp and what that camp wants to become.

    jungleman has some creativity. If he consistently be Doug Polk heads up, it's hard to imagine he is not. It's just not as televised I'm guessing.

    Haxton... Not as much.
  • Christian SotoChristian Soto RCP Coach Posts: 2,192 ✭✭✭✭
    “I am the math” - Jungleman
  • kenaceskenaces Red Chipper Posts: 1,382 ✭✭✭✭
    kenaces wrote: »
    kenaces wrote: »
    persuadeo wrote: »
    Robl probably uses more math than most anyone, certainly here. That doesn't mean he's forgotten how to actually play his opponent. We're in an age of very unimaginative players who need a sim to tell them what to do, but Robl arrived well before them, giving him the benefit of much experience when it comes to the actual game.

    I don't think the study of GTO means necessarily makes one unimaginative. Having a deep understanding of the game can help one think and play creatively when the opportunity presents itself.

    I do agree that 10+ years of high level poker experience is a big advantage.

    I think the majority of what I would call GTO players have little to no creativity because they are not confident enough in their ability to correctly find the deviation.

    I think you are making a big assumption.

    I am, but would you argue that Jungleman or Haxton have a creative bone? Those are the best of that camp and what that camp wants to become.

    Funny you bring up two guys who came up the ranks LONG before solvers and the current interest in GTO. I wouldn't make any judgments about their games these days as I have only seen a very small number of hands they played online.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file