Board texture video

tfaziotfazio Red Chipper Posts: 819 ✭✭✭
edited June 2015 in Coaching & Commercial
Ed, Can you post the specific shaping of the 40% range you are referencing in the video the last 10% kind of skews the percentages one way and another and It would be easier for me to understand.

Comments

  • hyPOTcrisyhyPOTcrisy Red Chipper Posts: 260
    Flopzilla's 40% range comes out to

    22+, Axs,Ako-A8o,KQs-K7s,KQo-K9o,QJs-Q8s,QJo-Q9o,JTs-J8s,JTo-J9o,T9s-43s, T9o-54o,T8s-64s,T8o-64o
  • tfaziotfazio Red Chipper Posts: 819 ✭✭✭
    In the flop texture video Ed says,
    "Assume players play a 40% preflop range including any pair, any ace, many suited hands and offsuit connectors and high card hands.”

    22+, A2+, K5s+, Q6s+, J7s+, T7s+, 98s - 54s, 97s - 64s, K9o+, Q9o+, J9o+, T9 - 87 = 40.3%

    The shaping of the range does not make that much difference on most flops but I was just wondering what the range Ed started with.

    Im a little lost with the way Ed describes flop texture in the book compared with the video.
    The video is easier to understand the concept but the book confuses it for me. also in the video the low to medium, medium to high, medium to very high reference is confusing. I wish he had used the numbers he started with to drive it home. complicated subject and very eye opening.
  • hyPOTcrisyhyPOTcrisy Red Chipper Posts: 260
    tfazio wrote:
    Im a little lost with the way Ed describes flop texture in the book compared with the video.
    The video is easier to understand the concept but the book confuses it for me. also in the video the low to medium, medium to high, medium to very high reference is confusing. I wish he had used the numbers he started with to drive it home. complicated subject and very eye opening.

    Strong Hits refers to how often your opponents range will hit a flop with made hands THEY will feel "got there" and are likely to call down with. Hands like sets, two pair, TPTK, and even OESD and Nut Flush Draws.

    Weak hits refers to hands like middle or bottom pairs or pockets that are under pairs, gut shots and backdoor draws.

    Combined, these give you total hits.

    Type 1 boards Tend to miss a lot of hands (Low Total Hit Rate, but High "Strong Hit" rate when they do hit). So, you Cbet, BUT if you get called, your opponent likely has a "strong hit" and will likely call twice or more. So there is a LOW success rate for flop and turn barrels. Without serious equity, you need to consider a stab at the flop then giving up if called.

    Characteristics of a Type 1 Board: The highest card is an A or K maybe even a Q. The other two are disconnected lower cards like 8 or lower. Adding two suited cards muddies the water since flush draws are also likely to call your flop bet. But typically consider a flop like :Ks:8s:3c at type 1 board.

    Type 2 boards tend to HIT a lot of hands but lean toward Weak Hits, thus the success rate of a turn barrel is greater. So fire two barrels and watch them fold. Characteristics of a Type 2 board are that the high card is a middle to high card like Q-T, the other two cards are relatively connected, either to the top card, or each other. So a board like :Qs:8c:7h will hit a lot of suited connected cards like JTs, T9s, 98s, 87s, 76s, and 65s, and hands like KTs, or KJs, QTs, QJs. But notice few of these hands is going to feel like they have a lock on this pot and if you continue barreling at them, there is a HIGH fold frequency on the turn.

    Type 3 boards tend to HIT often and are normally STRONG hits. Ed recommended letting these pots go unless of course YOU hit the flop strong yourself. These are the Broadway boards like: :Ac:Ks:Jh or :Ks:Qh:Tc or :Qh:Jd:Tc etc.

    Ed also describe boards in terms of being "Dry" and "Static" where dry refers to the lack of obvious draws and static refers to the fact that anyone who already had a "made" hand on a flop is highly likely to be the winner by the river ( the lead doesn't change so it's static). The counter concepts to these are "wet" and "Dynamic" boards:

    A static board might look like :Ks:8c:3s anyone with Kx with a decent kicker is feeling confident. This is also a dry board as there are no obvious draws to straights or flushes.

    Wet boards have lots of obvious draws:
    :9c:Tc:7s or :Qs:Js:Th

    Dynamic boards are those where the lead is likely to change:
    :7c:5s:2h any one with Top Pair here doesn't feel overly safe with their hand. The odds of an overcard hitting are extremely high, thus the lead is likely to change as the hand progresses. This makes it "dynamic"
  • tfaziotfazio Red Chipper Posts: 819 ✭✭✭
    Thanks, I get that. however the terms low to medium medium to high, medium to very high confuse me. Is he talking about strong hits and total hits including weak being medium to high as in first number and second number. e.g.30% strong hits and 58% total hits including weak. AT3 rainbow for example hit the flop TP or better 30% (strong hits) and 60% if you include another 30% weak hits. How is this low to medium compared to a type 2 board of JT3 two tone with only 18% strong hits and around 60% total hits being medium to high. I guess I'm asking what exactly is he referring to as "low to medium" I'm assuming they are two different numbers.

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