Transition from online to live NLHE

MrNiceMrNice Red Chipper Posts: 104 ✭✭
Dear poker friends,

Next august I`m planing on playing 2/2 live regulary on weekends in the casino. I played around 50k hands online (5NL and 10NL) on various site with a steady win rate around 8 bb and won a few small stakes tournaments.

I like to have your advice when transfering to live. What BR should I have? Are there any good sites or books about live poker (Like live tells etc.)?

Tomorrow, I planned to play a freeroll in a poker room (live) with a seat fee of 25 USD. Is this a good training wheel for live? I only played once in a casino and 5/7 players were very loose passive.

I dont have any friends involved in poker so it would be nice to meet up with someone in Zurich Switzerland to exchange knowledge.

Greetings,

Mr. Nice

Comments

  • MichaelBMichaelB Red Chipper Posts: 211 ✭✭✭
    Great to hear, Mr Nice. Given your win rate over the last 50k hands, with the right adjustments, you should do well.

    Here are some things off the top of my head that are different in live poker to online.

    • People like to call a lot more, so your opens need to be bigger. And there are usually loads of limpers at the lower level. Yes, loose passive is the standard approach by most. My standard open in a $1/3 game is $15, and that can go up to as large as $35 depending on how many limpers there are and what position I'm in.

    • The general understanding of poker game theory is much lower live than online. Most players are not, or never have, studied the game past the odd book ten years ago. You may find yourself up against players who are not putting you on a range per say, thinking about blockers, using optimal sizing, reasons to bet/check etc, ... You'll need to identify those players and make the necessary adjustments.

    • Most players 3bet WAY less live than online. Unless you find a reason to think otherwise, you should give their 3bets respect.

    • Punishing the limpers can be a winning strategy, but don't go overboard with it. You have to balance your ability to pick up blinds and small pots vs disciplined folds and limping along with the crowd. I personally noticed my win rate skyrocket once I adjusted from trying to isolate all the time with weak but playable hands in position to limping along and playing fit or fold. You'll be surprised what people will pay you off with in a live game, regardless of board texture and pre-flop/post-flop action.

    • In addition to that, being one of only a couple of players, or sometime the only player on the table utilising an advanced, balanced 3betting strategy will put you at a significant advantage over the rest of the field.

    • Don't worry so much about live tells, which are real, but not so much things like scratching the nose, more just general confidence and betting patterns and frequencies. The biggest money making edge a focused player will have live though is being able to categorise an opponent through visual clues like age, dress, confidence and table chatter.

    I don't think I'd ever go back to online poker. The edges a studious, focused player can have over the average low stakes field is just so much higher than you'll ever find online, even at stakes as low as 5NL.
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 2,130 -
    Much of the rationale behind putting RCP together in the first place was for live NLHE. Hence "red chip." Similarly many of the books published by RCP authors are aimed at live play.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • RedRed Red Chipper Posts: 2,090 ✭✭✭✭
  • YoshYosh Red Chipper Posts: 580 ✭✭✭
    edited March 22
    I'm doing this right now. Remember that the game is the same game you have been playing online, albeit in a much more information rich environment with diverse strategies coming from diverse stack sizes. The entry level live ranges are not the same as what you would imagine online. I'd also add that you should try to prepare yourself mentally/emotionally for the monetary swings. 10NL to 2/2 is a 20x jump in stakes that will often play even deeper. Good luck.
  • MrNiceMrNice Red Chipper Posts: 104 ✭✭
    Yosh wrote: »
    I'm doing this right now. Remember that the game is the same game you have been playing online, albeit in a much more information rich environment with diverse strategies coming from diverse stack sizes. The entry level live ranges are not the same as what you would imagine online. I'd also add that you should try to prepare yourself mentally/emotionally for the monetary swings. 10NL to 2/2 is a 20x jump in stakes that will often play even deeper. Good luck.

    Im building my bankroll for live outside of poker since I dont believe I can crush 200NL online and online poker is banned in my country.
  • EazzyEazzy Red Chipper Posts: 955 ✭✭✭✭
    Ive personally never been a fan of the big raises to stop players from playing weak ranges. Yes if you can isolate the one really bad player with big raises who still calls with a wide range then go for it. But if 10 bb causes one caller with a 10% calling range, over a 4 bb raise that gets 4 to 6 callers with 30% to 50 % ranges, go for the the multi way pots.

    For me the main transition was embracing these multi way pots. Players tend to play them very straight forward.

    Because preflop calling ranges tend to be wide and often can be erratic..."big cards keep missing so I'm going to call with 42 off this time" type nonsense. Most hand reading really starts on the flop. And its pretty easy as they play very passive and striaght forward, often playing diffrent parts of their range completely different..

    It can be a easy as...top pair good kicker donk pot....top pair weak kicker or 2nd pair donk 1/2 pot....draw check call...big hand check raise... Sure all are not quite this obvious but many are, or are by the turn...

    forget 90% of balance, and go for major exploiting...


  • MrNiceMrNice Red Chipper Posts: 104 ✭✭
    I played last friday a freeroll. I realized that I lack a lot of "live" skills, like calculating pot size etc. I was a lot more stressed than online and couldnt think clearly. I also didnt know how to bet and raise correctly.

    Is there an experienced live player who could give a newcomer to live a 101 on live poker?
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 2,130 -
    MrNice wrote: »
    I played last friday a freeroll. I realized that I lack a lot of "live" skills, like calculating pot size etc. I was a lot more stressed than online and couldnt think clearly. I also didnt know how to bet and raise correctly.

    Is there an experienced live player who could give a newcomer to live a 101 on live poker?

    This may help. In some ways it's just a question of practice.

    https://redchippoker.com/online-to-live-poker-transition/
    Moderation In Moderation
  • YoshYosh Red Chipper Posts: 580 ✭✭✭
    Figure out which things are giving you trouble, then focus on them when you play. Practice keeping track of how much money is going into the pot, practice figuring out how much is in the pot without watching it go in. Practice estimating stack sizes at a glance. Practice counting out bets. Practice breathing and staying relaxed while people are staring at you or antagonizing you. Online play has made you weak in many areas that are considered second nature for live players. I am practicing these things myself at this very moment.
  • MrNiceMrNice Red Chipper Posts: 104 ✭✭
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    MrNice wrote: »
    I played last friday a freeroll. I realized that I lack a lot of "live" skills, like calculating pot size etc. I was a lot more stressed than online and couldnt think clearly. I also didnt know how to bet and raise correctly.

    Is there an experienced live player who could give a newcomer to live a 101 on live poker?

    This may help. In some ways it's just a question of practice.

    https://redchippoker.com/online-to-live-poker-transition/

    Thanks TheGameKat :-)
  • EazzyEazzy Red Chipper Posts: 955 ✭✭✭✭
    Dont put to much strain on yoyrself the first few times you play...trybto have fun...

    When i first started live 1 2 i shook like a keaf. Pkayers teased me about it. It was not the money..i plaed 6 tableas of 100 nl sith more money..and day traded for some sick swings...so putting up 300 was no big deal....

    But ego...or whatever made it hard...i would bluf win the pot and shake for ten minutes with an adrenaline rush.



    after a few sessions i settled down..got used to the games and began to really enjoy hand reading...woorking out strategies. Looking for exploits ect. im never board...i find 4 hours of live poker to go by really fast now...im often exgausted. But almost never bard

    Dint push it just enjoy the game the first few times you play....keep your ranges tight....dont think i play so much better then these idiots i can lim0 Q9s. Utg....or whatever...I was lucky i got punished early for getting board and doing that.....
  • MichaelBMichaelB Red Chipper Posts: 211 ✭✭✭
    My suggestion is to standardise as much as you can, and let it become muscle memory. That way, eventually, you don't have to ever think about it. Get into habits. Every pot I'm involved in, I check my cards about 3 players before the action gets to me. I look at my cards the same way every time. I do the same thing with my cards after I've looked at them. I call, raise or fold the same way. As the chips are being collected into the pot, I count up the size and re-check the stacks involved. As the flop is about to be put out I re-look at my hand to commit the suits to memory. This step isn't necessary for every hand, but I do it every hand I play nonetheless. I don't ever have to think about any of this. While I'm doing all of it I'm thinking about stack sizes, players, flops I'm hoping for and getting ready to think about ranges.

    Keep your stack in clean, ordered towers so you always know how much is in front of you. When you want to call or raise, take the required number of chips directly from a single tower with one hand and put them in front of you in a consistent manner. If you need to count out chips, break the tower into even divisions of the number you want to bet or raise in front of you, then stack them back up into a single unit and put out the bet. Don't fumble around holding a big stack with two hands.

    Lastly. I would just say, if it's all stressing you out, don't rush yourself. Take your time. Don't feel pressured to act more quickly than you're comfortable with.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file