Question about Ed Miller's Multiway Pots Advice in The Course

babalouisebabalouise Red Chipper Posts: 26 ✭✭
In The Course playlist series, I'm watching the one called $1/$2 Multiway Pots. In this episode, Ed is talking about how to deal with wild games where, no matter what you raise pre-flop, you always find yourself with multiple callers.

Here is his example of "don't pay them off". You have Jh Js. You raise $15 in the CO, after 3 limpers. The blinds both call, as do all the limpers, so you go to the flop with 5 opponents. Flop comes:

9s 8h 4c

Checked to you and you bet $60 into a $90 pot. Two callers. Turn comes:

9h

Big blind shoves all-in. Ed's advice: He's repping the 9, you can't beat a set of 9's, so you fold. Insta-fold. 2.3 seconds, fold! Which goes back to lesson 2: "Don't pay them off!"

That's fine. My question is: What if that 9h comes on the turn and it goes check, check to you? Do you check, and then fold to any River bet, assuming "somebody has the 9", even though they didn't bet it (slow play, I guess?) on the turn?

Comments

  • needaglassofmilkneedaglassofmilk Red Chipper Posts: 66 ✭✭
    babalouise wrote: »
    In The Course playlist series, I'm watching the one called $1/$2 Multiway Pots. In this episode, Ed is talking about how to deal with wild games where, no matter what you raise pre-flop, you always find yourself with multiple callers.

    Here is his example of "don't pay them off". You have Jh Js. You raise $15 in the CO, after 3 limpers. The blinds both call, as do all the limpers, so you go to the flop with 5 opponents. Flop comes:

    9s 8h 4c

    Checked to you and you bet $60 into a $90 pot. Two callers. Turn comes:

    9h

    Big blind shoves all-in. Ed's advice: He's repping the 9, you can't beat a set of 9's, so you fold. Insta-fold. 2.3 seconds, fold! Which goes back to lesson 2: "Don't pay them off!"

    That's fine. My question is: What if that 9h comes on the turn and it goes check, check to you? Do you check, and then fold to any River bet, assuming "somebody has the 9", even though they didn't bet it (slow play, I guess?) on the turn?

    In another Ed Miller example (don't remember from where) but he talks about at low stakes, betting for value until they show you they have a hand by betting or raising.

    So in this case (given no other information) we would most likely bet for value on turn and most rivers, but easily fold to a big raise on either street.

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