What makes for a "Bad" table?

Eon137Eon137 Red Chipper Posts: 170 ✭✭
edited September 29 in General Concepts
"You know you're at a bad table when..."

Symptoms of bad tables include: nitty players, short stacks, high rake, stakes too high, stakes too low, too many tough players, too many passive sticky players, obnoxious players, smelly players...

What combinations of these and other factors are enough for you to decide a game is not worth playing and look for a table or venue change?

Comments

  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 2,612 -
    I'm too old to breathe in someone's B.O.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,809 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 29
    It better be the only game in town and very profitable for me to spend my life with really obnoxious people. Nitty players and passive sticky players are both exploitable, and short stacks aren't much of a problem unless they're quite good, which is pretty rare.
  • Doug HullDoug Hull RCP Coach Posts: 1,790 -
    There are players that, were they at a cocktail party would find themselves barging into group only to see it quickly disperse and then have to move on to the next.

    Now they find themselves with a captive audience...
    Co-founder Red Chip Poker,
    Author Poker Plays You Can Use
    Author Poker Workbook for Math Geeks
  • EurocratEurocrat Red Chipper Posts: 30 ✭✭
    I'm coming from an online perspective, but I've been thinking about this and I feel it kinda fits into the thread: If you had the choice between a seat with a good player on your left and a fish on your right, or the other way round - what would be the better option?
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 2,612 -
    Prefer the player with the higher VPIP on my right mostly irrespective of whether they're good or bad.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,809 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yeah, it really depends on why the good player is good and why the bad player is bad. There are two schools of thought - sit to the left of the player who plays more hands, or sit to the left of the player who is more unpredictable.
  • RoblivionRoblivion WisconsinRed Chipper Posts: 301 ✭✭✭
    Last night I was at a 1/3 table where every other player had a stack between 50 and 150. To me, this was a bad table, because it was not the type of game I was looking to play. Even though it was a super beatable game because these dudes had no idea how to play a short stack strategy.

    I made $80 or so before my table change came up where I promptly stacked off for $380 with top pair versus a flopped set - something that could not have even happened at the first table. But I had more fun doing it.
  • CactusCardsCactusCards ArizonaRed Chipper Posts: 140 ✭✭
    Mike Postle. In all seriousness though, more than 3 hoodie/Sunglasses/FVRBL shirts and I’m usually looking for a table change. I think every table needs an outgoing, let’s get a round of cocktails guy to keep it loose. I’m happy to play that role and see if we can get the table to loosen up
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 2,612 -
    Mike Postle. In all seriousness though, more than 3 hoodie/Sunglasses/FVRBL shirts and I’m usually looking for a table change. I think every table needs an outgoing, let’s get a round of cocktails guy to keep it loose. I’m happy to play that role and see if we can get the table to loosen up

    :) I think provided you're not on-stream at Stones, playing against Mike Postle would be just fine.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • RosyRosy Red Chipper Posts: 3 ✭✭
    The worst tables I play at are where 2 or more players are talking strategy or discussing lines at the table. I love talking about poker strategy and hearing other people's opinions, especially when it helps correct flaws in my game, but not at the table!

    When you talk strat at the table, I think only two bad things can happen:

    1) You expose your thought process to thinking players, who may use that information against you later.
    2) You reiterate to recreational players that poker is a skill game, and they are taking the worst of it. Further, you identify yourself to them as one of the predators, and that may lead them to play better against you or leave altogether.

    When someone comments to me about how they played a hand, or how I played it, or how a third party played it, I just give a rueful smile and say, "Yeah, I see your point. Oh, did you see the 49er game on Sunday?"
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,809 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yeah, I'm mostly the same way, but often it's not so bad. There are some rec players that actually like talking strategy, and it reminds me of the blackjack phenomenon. Thorpe wrote his book Beat The Dealer in the 60s, and people started playing blackjack in droves. Casinos panicked and some actually closed blackjack tables. But actually, basically no one actually implemented strategies successfully, and casinos actually made more money after the book came out. More players playing only slightly better than before = more profit for casinos.

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