Suited Connectors

Mr_Big_StackMr_Big_Stack Over The RoadRed Chipper Posts: 34 ✭✭
I've read many hand histories that always have a reply stating how great the "playability" is of SC. Just what does that mean? We certainly aren't hoping for TP (unless it's AK, KQ). If the flop is two-suited we miss 75% of the time.

Also you can't make a straight without a 5 or 10. Does this have any significance? Is it better to have 54s than 76s or T9s tha QJs?

Comments

  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Las VegasPosts: 4,863 -
    I think you'll find 76s makes straights.

    The idea of playability as it's usually discussed here is that it provides postflop semi-bluff opportunities and/or we have robust equity.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 5,007 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Also you can't make a straight without a 5 or 10. Does this have any significance? Is it better to have 54s than 76s or T9s tha QJs?

    Here's a funny story. I was playing with a guy who was convinced that TT55 is one of the strongest possible Omaha hands. You can just imagine how he conjured up that nonsense.

    Anyway, it might seem intuitive that holding a 5 or T in your hand might improve your chances of making a straight, because after all, if we know we have a necessary card, that beats any sub-100% chance of flopping one of the necessary cards.

    But this is something of an "optical illusion" so to speak. This is not at all like saying to make the nut flush, the ace of the suit is necessary. So, you're more likely to make the nut flush while holding the suited ace than hoping it comes on the flop. For example, we feel pretty confident we're going to have the nut flush if we make one holding :AH::TH: , however not so confident when holding :KH::TH: .

    The 5s and Ts are simply a consequence of the linear form of a straight, not a "necessity" like holding the nut suit. There is simply not enough room between 5 and 10 to make a straight (6,7,8,9 doesn't work.) All you need to calculate is the chance of making any straight with any connected cards. If you hold 76, you can make a straight if somewhere on the flop there is {3,4,5}, {4,5,8}, {5,8,9} or {8,9,10}. You'll find that is exactly the same chance as all the other connectors, until we get to the very high or very low cards. (There are only 2 ways instead of 4 to make a straight with KQ). Otherwise, it makes no difference if you hold a T or 5 in your hand because all combinations look like the above.

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