CORE Postflop ii Hit Frequencies

polarbear4ndpenguinpolarbear4ndpenguin Red Chipper Posts: 10 ✭✭
I just completely can't get what this lesson want to teach.
Could anyone help me in understanding it?
Thanks!

Comments

  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 3,656 -
    Such broad questions are almost impossible to answer well since they don't describe what is perplexing you, but I'll take a shot.

    The lesson starts with the premise that postflop action is determined by how well hands connect with the flop and subsequently later streets. This strikes me as a powerful idea that has the benefit of being intuitively obvious.

    To simplify the discussion, we consider a heads up situation. In such spots, it is again I think fairly clear that in general terms these four events can occur:

    Both players hit: a big pot gets played
    A hits, B misses: A usually wins the pot
    B hits, A misses: B usually wins the pot
    Both players miss: Aha!!!

    The first point of interest here is that both players "missing" (at least with many players' definition of a "miss") is the most common in poker, thus the person who wins the pot is usually the one who is more skilled at recognizing these spots.

    But the bigger takeaway is that different boards (and the lesson mainly addresses flops since that's the defining point in most NLHE hands), hit typical ranges differently. Because of this, simply by looking at the publicly-available information provided by the flop, a studied player immediately has valuable information about how their opponent's range has connected with this flop.

    The rest of the lesson basically discusses how to exploit this information to make $$$.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • polarbear4ndpenguinpolarbear4ndpenguin Red Chipper Posts: 10 ✭✭
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    Such broad questions are almost impossible to answer well since they don't describe what is perplexing you, but I'll take a shot.

    The lesson starts with the premise that postflop action is determined by how well hands connect with the flop and subsequently later streets. This strikes me as a powerful idea that has the benefit of being intuitively obvious.

    To simplify the discussion, we consider a heads up situation. In such spots, it is again I think fairly clear that in general terms these four events can occur:

    Both players hit: a big pot gets played
    A hits, B misses: A usually wins the pot
    B hits, A misses: B usually wins the pot
    Both players miss: Aha!!!

    The first point of interest here is that both players "missing" (at least with many players' definition of a "miss") is the most common in poker, thus the person who wins the pot is usually the one who is more skilled at recognizing these spots.

    But the bigger takeaway is that different boards (and the lesson mainly addresses flops since that's the defining point in most NLHE hands), hit typical ranges differently. Because of this, simply by looking at the publicly-available information provided by the flop, a studied player immediately has valuable information about how their opponent's range has connected with this flop.

    The rest of the lesson basically discusses how to exploit this information to make $$$.

    Very thanks for typing so much and I can basicly understand what you write. I only have 2 questions now:
    1. Is that all this lesson gonna to teach?
    2. "Because of this, simply by looking at the publicly-available information provided by the flop, a studied player immediately has valuable information about how their opponent's range has connected with this flop. "

    What is the thinking process of a studied players?
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 3,656 -
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    I don't know what you mean by "Is that all this lesson is going to teach." I've given the best summary I can of the key features, but taken in total the lesson likely illuminates other CORE modules.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • polarbear4ndpenguinpolarbear4ndpenguin Red Chipper Posts: 10 ✭✭
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    I don't know what you mean by "Is that all this lesson is going to teach." I've given the best summary I can of the key features, but taken in total the lesson likely illuminates other CORE modules.

    Maybe my bad English : p. I mean Is that all this lesson want to teach?
    "I've given the best summary I can of the key features" so you solved my question.
    Many Thanks! : )
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 3,656 -
    Welcome.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • polarbear4ndpenguinpolarbear4ndpenguin Red Chipper Posts: 10 ✭✭
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    Do they use Flopzilla?
  • RedRed Red Chipper Posts: 2,359 ✭✭✭✭
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    Do they use Flopzilla?

    There are a lot of (good) software: Flopzilla, HoldEQ, Equilab (pro or not), CardRunners EV, Excel, PioSOLVER, GTO+, Poker Cruncher, Flopfalcon, (and ICMIZER 2 for tourney). Some pro like Doug Polk even have their own private software (which they don't release/sell).
    Depends on your needs.

    Flopzilla ist an exceptional tool. If you want to study poker "old school", it's the best.
    (Old school bc trend is now on solver, so it would be more GTO+ and PioSOLVER.)
  • polarbear4ndpenguinpolarbear4ndpenguin Red Chipper Posts: 10 ✭✭
    Red wrote: »
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    Do they use Flopzilla?

    There are a lot of (good) software: Flopzilla, HoldEQ, Equilab (pro or not), CardRunners EV, Excel, PioSOLVER, GTO+, Poker Cruncher, Flopfalcon, (and ICMIZER 2 for tourney). Some pro like Doug Polk even have their own private software (which they don't release/sell).
    Depends on your needs.

    Flopzilla ist an exceptional tool. If you want to study poker "old school", it's the best.
    (Old school bc trend is now on solver, so it would be more GTO+ and PioSOLVER.)

    Ok,Got it
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Posts: 3,656 -
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    Do they use Flopzilla?

    I prefer Equilab, but I'm in the minority at RCP.
    Moderation In Moderation
  • polarbear4ndpenguinpolarbear4ndpenguin Red Chipper Posts: 10 ✭✭
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    Do they use Flopzilla?

    I prefer Equilab, but I'm in the minority at RCP.

    Just purchsed flopzilla, Don't know much about powerequilab, if it just a software which only caculate equity, why they charge money? : (
  • RedRed Red Chipper Posts: 2,359 ✭✭✭✭
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    Studied players have done off-table range work to develop an understanding of how diffident ranges hit different boards. This informs their postflop betting lines.

    Do they use Flopzilla?

    I prefer Equilab, but I'm in the minority at RCP.

    Just purchsed flopzilla, Don't know much about powerequilab, if it just a software which only caculate equity, why they charge money? : (

    Equilab also has a free version. The one to purchase offer more options.

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