JJ on a AA8 board

osgoboosgobo Red Chipper Posts: 60 ✭✭
A round of straddles has been called in a 9 handed $1/$3 game and our hero is on the straddle with JhJd. When the action is back on our hero 7 people have limped in for the $6 straddle. Our hero is sitting on $270. Three of the limpers have about $100, 2 have about $300, and 2 have $800+. Hero makes it $41, UTG and UTG+1 both call, they are the two players with $300 and both are unknown to our hero, everyone else folds.

The pot is $153 and the flop comes down AsAc8d. Our hero has $229 left, what should he do?

Comments

  • KeyserS023KeyserS023 Red Chipper Posts: 6 ✭✭
    edited January 24
    Not sure the right answer to your question, but I'd seriously consider shoving pre-flop: this is not a hand I want to play multi-way post-flop. And with the straddle, your stack is only 45BB. Thoughts?
  • Bill SBill S Red Chipper Posts: 43 ✭✭
    another option from my non-pro perspective. As played, your probably best against their limp call ranges, but SPR if small so it seems likely the money is going in before the river. Option 1- if either of the players is aggressive and would bet with a pocket pair or 8x , you could check, jam and if it checks through reevaluate and probably bet out turn. Option 2- bet a size that keeps their pocket pairs in, like $75. if they fold, fine. If one calls, fine because you can shove a 1/2 pot bet on the turn and get called by worse. If your flop bet gets raised, meh. Prob fold unless villain is a bluffy type and thimks your weak.

    I also like keyser's thoughts. You bet a pot size bet OOP preflop, so any caller after you gets decent position and odds to see a flop. Bigger reduces those odds so maybe bet $80. This will reduces a lot of the calling range of the villains and make postflop a little easier to read. Calling a 2x pot pet from and an early position player preflop is gonna weed out hands like 56 suited-89 suited and some of the Ax holdings (like A6-A9 suited) of the calling range; leaving a lot of pocket pairs and suited broadways.

    Just some things to consider.
  • AceFromSpaceKKAceFromSpaceKK Red Chipper Posts: 303 ✭✭✭
    I am not a live player but when there is a straddle this means that this is the "new bb amount" right? So we have 45bb with JJ and in front of us are 6 limpers. I would always shove this preflop...
  • ulysses27ulysses27 Red Chipper Posts: 63 ✭✭
    I think a couple questions to ask is what are these players limp calling ranges. I'm guessing weak Ax, weak pp for set mining, and suited connectors. The other question is what kind of player limps and then calls a 7x raise. I would just think about loose player types. I like the idea of betting $75 because your ahead of a lot of their ranges but you do want worse to call. My only issue with shoving pre is that you don't really get to realize the full equity if your hand.
  • osgoboosgobo Red Chipper Posts: 60 ✭✭
    As played our hero bets $45 on the flop. His logic for making this bet : even though these players are unknown to him, anyone that limps a straddle UTG and then calls a 7x raise probably has a lot of trash in their range that they are looking to smash on the flop. Most of this trash is going to simply miss this flop by a mile and they will fold to almost any bet. Some of this trash is going to be Ax and they will have succeeded in their goal of smashing the flop. If all this is true, then, our hero concluded, there was no reason to bet more than $45.

    Do you agree with our hero's logic?
  • In The DarkIn The Dark Red Chipper Posts: 226 ✭✭
    KeyserS023 wrote: »
    Not sure the right answer to your question, but I'd seriously consider shoving pre-flop: this is not a hand I want to play multi-way post-flop. And with the straddle, your stack is only 45BB. Thoughts?

    ^^^^^^ T H I S ^^^^^^^^^^

    It's a great result for JJ to win 12BBs. Take it!
  • osgoboosgobo Red Chipper Posts: 60 ✭✭
    So, to continue the story, our hero has just made it $45 on the flop. UTG folds. UTG+1 goes into the tank and finally mutters under his breath "I just don't think you have it", and then throws in the $45. The turn is the 2d. ...Just a recap, we are on the turn the board is AsAc8d 2d, there is $248 in the pot, our hero has $184 left and villain has him covered.
    What should our hero do now?
  • osgoboosgobo Red Chipper Posts: 60 ✭✭
    As played, our hero believes the villain when he muttered, "I just don't think you have it", and because the turn didn't change anything hero ships it all-in hoping villain is still a non-believer. Villain goes into the tank for nearly 2 full minutes before finally saying, "I call". The dealer drops the 7d and villain happily rolls over KdQd for a runner runner flush. ... At this point in the story our hero goes crazy, he runs over to the nearest slot machine rips the arm right off the side of the machine and then uses the arm to beat the villain to death! ...Just kidding, our hero says, "nice pot!" and then calls for chips because it's just another hand.
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,944 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • Ataxia13Ataxia13 Red Chipper Posts: 13 ✭✭
    I am a bit surprised, when villains typically give a speech like "I don't think you have it." and they call, then usually they are the ones who have it. This is the first time that I have heard about the opposite tell.
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,944 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ataxia13 wrote: »
    I am a bit surprised, when villains typically give a speech like "I don't think you have it." and they call, then usually they are the ones who have it. This is the first time that I have heard about the opposite tell.


    I'm old enough for this not to be the first time for me, but that was my first reaction when I read this as well :)

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