How do you guys handle being card dead for long periods of time during a tournament?

1AMPOKER_1AMPOKER_ Las VegasRed Chipper Posts: 37 ✭✭
I know that the initial reaction to this question is: "He's getting hands and just doesn't know what to do with them!" but I assure you that when I say, "Card Dead", I mean Card Dead like you read about. 93, J4, K2, T2, etc. When this occurs, how do you guys handle very long stretches of this? Do you make moves anyway or just try to ride it out?

Best Answers

  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Las VegasPosts: 4,863 -
    Accepted Answer
    For me it depends on the stage of the tournament. In the early levels, I don't worry about it. Once you're below about 25bb you can look for light 3-bet shoves if the table dynamics set up well for it, particularly in turbo structures. If you're both card dead and situation dead, simply wait until you're in push/fold range and play accordingly.
  • MnpokerMnpoker Red Chipper Posts: 176 ✭✭
    Accepted Answer
    Like Kat said it depends. How aggressive are the two players to you left? Will they call wide or do they fold to aggression? How many BB do you have and how fast are the blind levels? Also how comfortable are you playing a short stack? And these are just some things to think about. I wouldn’t worry until about 25-30BB then you need to go lighter but don’t get nuts. I played today and saw a player shove 15BB into a raise with 2 callers with 9-6 suited. Don’t commit tournament suicide, I would like at least a suited face card and would love J9 off plus. That said it is all fluid with table dynamics and your biggest concern being the 2 players to your left. 1 other stressor is the player to to your right, if they play a lot of hands it will effect what you can do. More can play into it like how far til the money and are you playing to cash or to win and other things. So no simple answer just don’t get frustrated and punt it off
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Las VegasPosts: 4,863 -
    Accepted Answer
    1AMPOKER_ wrote: »
    I appreciate the advice guys. And @Kat, that suggested mtt playlist you sent me, I'm going through it now

    Cool, I hope it's proving helpful.
  • KossKoss Red Chipper Posts: 61 ✭✭
    Accepted Answer
    I think a lot of players who don't play many tournaments get hung up on this because many tournaments play out that way. I've definitely played live tourneys where I didn't get any playable hands in 2 hours, the blinds just went up, and suddenly I have a 5BB stack and have to shove J9o or some crap. The variance and amount of tourneys it takes to achieve the "long run" expectation are pretty massive for tourneys. If you are a casual live tourney player, it can be pretty difficult to ever fully realize your ROI. But if you play enough, you'll have some tourneys where you're dead and get blinded out, and others where you run over the field. It all equals out in the end. The temptation to force action when dead is there, and don't succumb to it. I think of tournaments as just one long cash game. Personally I prefer the card dead tourneys to ones where I run up a huge stack then get busted out near the bubble on a beat or cooler. Those ones shave years off my life, lol.
  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Las VegasPosts: 4,863 -
    Accepted Answer
    Couple of additional observations.

    First, if you're getting to the push/fold range within 2 hours, that's not a structure that promotes skill. Further, those turbos typically have punitive juice.

    Second, to repeat something above, it's perfectly feasible to play perfectly below ~25bb. This is the primary reason I don't worry about being card dead.
  • MnpokerMnpoker Red Chipper Posts: 176 ✭✭
    Accepted Answer
    1AMPoker another note. Depending on your position, the action in front of you, and your stack depth some of the examples that you gave as being card dead are playable hands

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