Pocket 6's in SB against UTG raise

pterrypterry Red Chipper Posts: 3 ✭✭
NOTE: This is the first hand history I've ever posted! I am very new to the game so any and all insights are much appreciated. Thanks in advance!

No Limit Hold'em $0.02/$0.05
Bodog (Ignition)
5 players

Stacks:
UTG - VIL ($5.94)
MP - MP ($8.00)
BTN - BTN ($1.23)
SB - HERO ($5.28)
BB - BB ($4.95)

This hand was played early in the session so I didn't have a read on UTGs play.

Preflop: ($0.07, 5 players) Hero is SB with 6h6s
UTG Raise to $0.15, folds to Hero in SB. Hero calls $0.13. BB folds.

Flop: 4c 9h 4s ($0.35, 2 players - Hero: $5.13, Vil: $5.79)
Hero checks, Vil bets $0.17, Hero calls

Turn: 7d ($0.69, 2 players - Hero: $4.96, Vil: $5.62)
Hero checks, Vil bets $0.50, Hero folds

My analysis:
My plan with low pocket pairs is to try to hit a set, and check/fold otherwise. This is a case where, even though I missed the set, I feel I may still be ahead. UTG open raise range would likely miss this board a lot of the time (i.e broadways, Ax).

I call the flop cbet hoping the villain slows down on the turn. The 7d comes, which feels like a blank, but the villain bets anyways. I choose to fold, feeling like my 66 doesn't have enough showdown value to call.

My main questions are:

Is my preflop call too loose? Are the implied odds of hitting a set enough to always call a 3bb raise oop?

Is my call on the flop justified? And would check raising be a possible line, targeting UTGs hands that missed the flop?

Thanks!

Comments

  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Las VegasPosts: 5,479 -
    Interesting, well-presented hand.

    As a general rule, if you never call a raise out of the SB preflop, your play and results will likely improve. Our CORE recommendations are a pure 3b-or-fold strategy from SB, with 22-88 being folds even against a 2.5x sizing.

    As played, check-call flop, check-fold turn is fairly natural, but it sort of illustrates the problem of calling pre from the SB. Old school players like to talk about "set-mining odds" without fully acknowledging you get into these murky spots where you're likely to lose another bet at least, and possibly end up folding the best hand.

    I quite like the idea of check-raising this particular flop. You often fold out the double overcards that have ~25% equity against you. The big overpairs aren't going anywhere, but they'll make themselves known and you can respond accordingly. Your aggression may even give you 2 shots to spike your set/boat.
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  • pterrypterry Red Chipper Posts: 3 ✭✭
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    I quite like the idea of check-raising this particular flop. You often fold out the double overcards that have ~25% equity against you. The big overpairs aren't going anywhere, but they'll make themselves known and you can respond accordingly. Your aggression may even give you 2 shots to spike your set/boat.
    Thanks for the feedback! Any thoughts on what an appropriate check-raise size might be on the flop?

  • TheGameKatTheGameKat Las VegasPosts: 5,479 -
    pterry wrote: »
    TheGameKat wrote: »
    I quite like the idea of check-raising this particular flop. You often fold out the double overcards that have ~25% equity against you. The big overpairs aren't going anywhere, but they'll make themselves known and you can respond accordingly. Your aggression may even give you 2 shots to spike your set/boat.
    Thanks for the feedback! Any thoughts on what an appropriate check-raise size might be on the flop?

    I don't know this player pool, so hard to be definitive. Since it's basically a programmed bluff, I think you're looking for the minimum size that will fold out the overs. $0.55-0.65 maybe, depending on how sticky these players are?
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