Buy-in size, when to chip-up

ScottValScottVal Red Chipper Posts: 108
A very basic topic is how much to buy in for, and, if your stack gets whittled away, when to chip up. A related question is whether to keep extra chips in your pocket.

As a beginning player, you probably want to buy in for the minimum. A typical 1/2 NL game might have a $60 minimum.

Then, if your stack starts to shrink, you probably don't want to let it get ridiculously small. Personally, I like to keep some green $25 chips in my pocket, for example, if my stack gets down to about $50, I'll throw a green chip on it, bringing my stack up to $75.

Similar ideas apply when you play for a full buy-in, which is $200 in many games. Some players will carry black $100 chips in their pocket. Their stack gets down to $100 and they add-on with a black chip. I prefer green; my stack gets down to $175, and I throw a green chip on.

Other players will let their stack get whittled all the way down, and finally go all-in pre-flop for $15. I've always thought this seemed silly.

Comments

  • kytmagickytmagic Red Chipper Posts: 204 ✭✭
    Very good tips! I've been in the habit of keeping at least another buy-in on me at all times though it's possibly wiser to have even more than that? This is a subject that I haven't seen any books talk about.
  • ScottValScottVal Red Chipper Posts: 108
    Hi kyt, thanks for the reply. I'm not sure how many buy-ins your should keep in your pocket. I think it helps to have at least some chips in your pocket. I often have about $100 in green in my pocket. Of course you can buy more, either at the table, or at the poker room's desk, depending on the poker room, but that tends to slow you down and you might miss a hand or two. And hopefully you'll have a great session and never need to chip up!
  • kytmagickytmagic Red Chipper Posts: 204 ✭✭
    I'm feeling the right answer is probably well more than one buy-in seeing as how a failed c-bet is actually expensive in terms of the % of your stack that you have to invest in the move.
  • SplitSuitSplitSuit RCP Coach Posts: 4,081 -
    I tend to keep half a BI in my pocket so I can top off if necessary. If I ever need more than that, I just reload the normal way =)
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  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 5,007 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Personally, sometimes I enjoy playing shortstacked once in awhile, just for a change of pace. So if my stack gets low, I'll just leave it.

    But other than those times, I think the best idea is to determine your optimal buy in (who ever thinks about what that might be?), leave chips in your pocket, and continually chip up on the fly, any time you lose some chips.
  • hyPOTcrisyhyPOTcrisy Red Chipper Posts: 260
    I normally keep one of these under my chair

    500alum6.jpg

    but I re-buy a lot!
  • ChipXtractorChipXtractor Red Chipper Posts: 1,193 ✭✭✭✭
    As an add-on to this if I get short I will usually wait to top off until *After* I have played thru my blinds. I prefer to have a full stack when on the BTN and in LP. Not so much while in EP and in the blinds. Might be silly but it is just more comfortable for me.
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 5,007 ✭✭✭✭✭
    As an add-on to this if I get short I will usually wait to top off until *After* I have played thru my blinds. I prefer to have a full stack when on the BTN and in LP. Not so much while in EP and in the blinds. Might be silly but it is just more comfortable for me.

    It's not silly, it's usually smart. A variation on this - I play in a PLO - PLO/8 game - 1 round of each. PLO/8 is my better game, and it has lower variance, so I will also wait to chip up until it switches games, and specifically not when I'm in the blinds or early.
  • FilthyCasualFilthyCasual Red Chipper Posts: 871 ✭✭✭
    ScottVal wrote:
    As a beginning player, you probably want to buy in for the minimum. A typical 1/2 NL game might have a $60 minimum.
    Not really ever a fan of buying in for the minimum. As a beginning player, sure you'll lose less on an all in, but unless you've exclusively studied short stack, I don't think this is a good idea. I'm guessing the most common flaws for new players is folding to often to bets(if the player can adequately size up relative strength) and not betting often enough. Even if you're going to make these mistakes, having a larger stack can give the illusion that neither of these are going to be the status quo for your play.

    Also, after you've sat down at the table, you can rebuy for usually less than the initial minimum. There was a lady at a 3/6 limit table that seemed nice enough, but stepped away to take a call shortly after sitting down. One of the regs saidd 'As long as you don't directly tick this lady off, she'll feed us $20 bills all night'. And that's exactly what she did after the initial $60 buy. $20 rebuys at a time. Dwindle down to all in and lose. $20.
    ScottVal wrote:
    Other players will let their stack get whittled all the way down, and finally go all-in pre-flop for $15. I've always thought this seemed silly.
    I'll generally add on $40-$50 if I get down to $50 at 1/2. If I get below $40 and don't feel like adding on, I'll usually wait for until before my blinds, hope for a top 5% hand to jam on before them, and if not, just walk away.
  • UphillJillUphillJill Red Chipper Posts: 23
    It depends on what the average stacks at the table are, but I usually buyin for the max amount and keep an extra full buyin+ in my pocket. Whether or not I use it depends on if I lost chips to bad luck or bad play. If it was just run bad, I'll top off when I get down below half. If think I'm loosing hands because I'm playing badly due to being tired, unfocused, or whatever, it's time to leave.

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