Strange slow plays (concrete hand, against KK)

KnampfKnampf Red Chipper Posts: 162 ✭✭
edited September 2016 in General Concepts
Hi

Hand:
http://www.boomplayer.com/en/poker-hands/Boom/20728897_B6FAD69ECD
Me:AQs Him:KK

Hand is standard.

How would you play, how did I play?

My main question:
Why would he have KK here? It's not good for him but worse for me in this specific hand.

In the past, I always had huge problems with that. I very often fell for strange slow plays and lost much, just as here.

How can I deal with that?

Comments

  • persuadeopersuadeo Red Chipper, Table Captain Posts: 4,194 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Think about the position you are opening from and the answer becomes clear.
  • KnampfKnampf Red Chipper Posts: 162 ✭✭
    But you don't just flat KK because you're in early position, do you? Which good player would do this? How can I deal with that?
  • persuadeopersuadeo Red Chipper, Table Captain Posts: 4,194 ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you are going to have an EP on EP calling range, you have to have some premiums or else it's a disaster. Further, he can't just raise your EP range willy-nilly. So now he has to have some slowplays in the mix, although AA would be a better one as he doesn't give your Ax hands a free pass at realizing equity. I would suspect he does this at some frequency that is less than 25% in this exact spot, and this is one of them.

    His bet on the end was too small, though, that was a little silly when he does have bluffs to rep. Should've shoved.

    Reasoning makes for good players, not individual actions.

    You deal with it like any other spot - consider them as part of the range you are playing against.
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,827 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Knampf wrote: »
    But you don't just flat KK because you're in early position, do you?

    I don't think that's what he meant. Consider what you would be raising with as well.

    I don't think his play roughly speaking was bad. If he's so passive that he does this all the time, then it's bad. But personally I would play like your opponent did sometimes, at least the first 3 streets.

    A little bit of a cooler for you, but also the hand came down a little funny. To see what I mean, consider if you had hit the Q on the flop instead of the turn. Would you have played the hand exactly the same way? Why or why not?
  • KnampfKnampf Red Chipper Posts: 162 ✭✭
    To see what I mean, consider if you had hit the Q on the flop instead of the turn. Would you have played the hand exactly the same way? Why or why not?

    I would have played it the exact same way.

    Q on turn:
    Flop: bluff turn: value river: showdown value

    Q on flop:
    Flop: value turn: value river: showdown value

    I would have played it the exact same way because my bluff bet size and my value bet size is the same. He should have slightly different ranges by the way. There are some other reasons which don't really come to my mind that fast. Good question.
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,827 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2016
    OK so now the question is, how do you play big hand/big pot, small hand/small pot? e.g. let's look at the Q on flop scenario. Would it be reasonable to check one of those streets? In other words, is one pair always worth three full streets of value?
  • KnampfKnampf Red Chipper Posts: 162 ✭✭
    edited September 2016
    I think top pair is most of the time only worth 2 barrels. Else he would call 3 times and the pot gets big. What would he do this with except for maybe an overpair and for sure two-pair+. Also, I think he has few folds by the time he called 2 barrels so I can't bluff. QQ/KK/AA could bet 3 times to get money from weaker overpairs and top pair.

    For loose calling stations, this all might be different.

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