25NL - Flush Draw Out of Position

BoilerAceBoilerAce Red Chipper Posts: 289 ✭✭
After looking back at this, I think I'm okay the way I played it. Preflop, definitely yes, I'm ok. Post Flop, borderline...and definitely made the right decision to dump it after a bad turn card and being priced out. Do you agree or disagree? Could I have played it better?

GAME #3408907649: Texas Hold'em NL $0.10/$0.25 2017-01-08 06:17:37/GMT
Table Sharapova
Seat 1: P1_464787XJ ($43.51 in chips)
Seat 2: P2_697775PA ($14.28 in chips)
Seat 3: P3_362924ND ($29.53 in chips)
Seat 4: P4_170473JW ($31.86 in chips)
Seat 5: P5_875035IG ($24.90 in chips)
Seat 6: P6_266972KK ($51.99 in chips)
Seat 7: P7_354347IK ($11.76 in chips) DEALER
Seat 8: Hero ($22.58 in chips)
Seat 9: P9_548927PU ($25.00 in chips)
Hero: Post SB $0.10
P9_548927PU: Post BB $0.25
*** HOLE CARDS ***
Dealt to Hero [ :Th :Qh ]
P1_464787XJ: Raise (NF) $0.50
P2_697775PA: Call $0.50
P3_362924ND: Fold
P4_170473JW: Fold
P5_875035IG: Fold
P6_266972KK: Fold
P7_354347IK: Call $0.50
Hero: Call $0.40
P9_548927PU: Call $0.25
*** FLOP *** [ :Kh :2h :5s ]
Hero: Check
P9_548927PU: Bet $1.85
P1_464787XJ: Fold
P2_697775PA: Fold
P7_354347IK: Fold
Hero: Call $1.85
*** TURN *** [ :Kc ]
Hero: Check
P9_548927PU: Bet $2.85
Hero: Fold
*** SUMMARY ***
Total pot $8.74 Rake $0.31
P9_548927PU: wins $8.74

Comments

  • SplitSuitSplitSuit RCP Coach Posts: 3,658 -
    Out of curiosity, what do you think V does if you XR the turn?
    My latest poker course brings the popular book 'Poker's 1%' to life- The One Percent
  • BoilerAceBoilerAce Red Chipper Posts: 289 ✭✭
    SplitSuit wrote: »
    Out of curiosity, what do you think V does if you XR the turn?

    Splitsuit, I think I see where you are going here...

    I wasn't the preflop raiser here and checked post flop so as not to donk bet at the original raiser. I don't think all four villains will fold to an out of position Xbet and I might even see a reraise from them? Then what do I do? I look at it as a cheap way to keep under the radar of what I have and continue along seeing cards out of position as long as the flop gives me a chance to make the best hand. I also see it as a way to keep a multi-way pot going where I have pot/implied odds to keep seeing cheap cards. I can also sit back and sense the villain's degree of aggression too.

    So let's say I donk bet post flop. And I get called or raised? Now the turn pot is greater and I still need to see the river. Now I need to fire another 2/3-3/4 pot bet out of position which the villain could again call. So now I'm at showdown out of position and I'm screwed facing yet another big bet. The villain could have just a small pair and I'm still beat. I've now lost a ton instead of letting the villain lead the betting and having him keep the pot under control, thus losing minimum and finding a better spot.

    That's my thought process. After typing this out, I'm taking an angle of safety instead aggression. Story of my poker life. And I ended up paying for it with a series of in position bets that I didn't have the proper price to call. How would you have played it?
  • NinjahNinjah Red Chipper Posts: 931 ✭✭✭✭
    The problem is that by playing it the way you did, it's very clear that you're either on a draw or have a fairly weak hand which means Villain can exploit you by firing 100% of his range on the flop and again on the turn if he chooses to do so, or at least fire the turn at a high enough frequency to put pressure on you. If you check raise and he reshoves, you can either fold or stack off and if you choose to stack off you'll get there about 1/3 of the time (assuming that he doesn't have AhXh). What a check raise accomplishes more often than not is that it will place the pressure on Villain rather than yourself, giving you the initiative and forcing him to either fold (which will happen quite often on this board) or turn his hand into a bluff catcher. He has a lot of whiffed hands on this board and middle pocket pairs that you have significant equity against.
  • YoshYosh Red Chipper Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    I agree that passive OOP is a recipe for slow bleeding yourself to death.

    With this action, though, I usually would play it the same as you did. Donk bets are interesting and frequently weak, but you just don't know enough (or didn't say) about the opponent to get very aggressive here. He led into the preflop raiser in a very very strange spot when he had potential to check raise the entire table. Hard to tell what that means but it certainly could be a king or a better flush draw. Better to fight another day than light a check raise and river shove on fire.
  • NinjahNinjah Red Chipper Posts: 931 ✭✭✭✭
    Ninjah wrote: »
    The problem is that by playing it the way you did, it's very clear that you're either on a draw or have a fairly weak hand which means Villain can exploit you by firing 100% of his range on the flop and again on the turn if he chooses to do so, or at least fire the turn at a high enough frequency to put pressure on you. If you check raise and he reshoves, you can either fold or stack off and if you choose to stack off you'll get there about 1/3 of the time (assuming that he doesn't have AhXh). What a check raise accomplishes more often than not is that it will place the pressure on Villain rather than yourself, giving you the initiative and forcing him to either fold (which will happen quite often on this board) or turn his hand into a bluff catcher. He has a lot of whiffed hands on this board and middle pocket pairs that you have significant equity against.

    Completely disregard my post. I didn't see the donk bet and I thought it was a standard cbet.

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