Tipping and chopping blinds

alejandro galejandro g Red Chipper Posts: 13 ✭✭
edited February 2017 in General Concepts
I have two questions. What do you guys think about tipping when there is no flop? Do you generally do this or not? I recently stopped doing this and was wondering about general thoughts. My thoughts were that those tips add up to a significant amount and only found this out when I started tracking my sessions and taking poker way more serious. Needless to say I was shocked and realized this was a big leak. Which leads to my second questions. I also recently stopped chopping blinds because most of my opponents just refuse to play a pot heads up and if they do play I find that they are particularly weak giving me an immediate advantage even if I'm oop. Do you decide to chop or not depending on opponent? I do it regardless of opponent just to be fair and also to get used to being in some uncomfortable situations. What are your thoughts?

Comments

  • kageykagey Red Chipper, KINGOFTAGS Posts: 2,241 ✭✭✭✭✭
    most dealers don't expect to get tipped if someone raises and everybody folds.
    unless this is regular occurrance, I rarely tip when I pick up blinds.

    chopping often helps the game stay "friendly"
    I'll always chop if asked. Or play. Makes no difference to me.
    But if you chop - remember to always chop.
    It's sort of bad etiquette to chop from the SB when you're dealt 62os - but on the next orbit, tell the BB that you want to play because you're looking at KK.
    Since I don't look at my cards until it's my turn... I'll ask about chopping before even looking at my hand. Then act accordingly.

    hope this helps.
  • alejandro galejandro g Red Chipper Posts: 13 ✭✭
    @kagey I agree with always chopping or not and not being hand dependent but I disagree at keeping the game friendly only because we're all there to take each others money, which for me takes the friendly out of the equation. Also my reasoning for not chopping is that the times that I do tip, the 3 dollar bb I take down leverages the times I do tip. I play in a 2/3 game. Is this reasoning ok?
  • SicSemperSicSemper Red Chipper Posts: 105 ✭✭
    I always tip even if I just raise and take the blinds. I'm a firm believer in tipping across the board, in or out of the cardroom. Also, tip your chip runner, people. This is a guy doing you a service. Throw him a buck. People who tend to get tight with chips tend to not have worked in the service industry. If you do, you realize just how big a deal it is to get tipped or not.

    I always chop, too. Not so much as a situational thing, but just as a courtesy to other players to keep the game moving along. We all want to get to the next hand. On the rare occasion it's a high hand room and you have something that could hit a jackpot, playing is fine.
  • alejandro galejandro g Red Chipper Posts: 13 ✭✭
    @Lauren that's my point, most people at these limits are not comfortable playing heads up and will fold a large majority of the time allowing me to just steal at will. Very rarely will they take a stand and those blinds can add up. @SicSemper I always get my own chips or already have some on me so no need for chip runner. Also I have waited tables for years, don't anymore, so I do understand the value of tipping but also not trying to give away profit whether marginal or not when a flop is not dealt.
  • kageykagey Red Chipper, KINGOFTAGS Posts: 2,241 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @kagey I agree with always chopping or not and not being hand dependent but I disagree at keeping the game friendly only because we're all there to take each others money, which for me takes the friendly out of the equation. Also my reasoning for not chopping is that the times that I do tip, the 3 dollar bb I take down leverages the times I do tip. I play in a 2/3 game. Is this reasoning ok?
    whatever floats your boat.
    I don't think there's really a "right" or "wrong" way to approach chopping.

    I play "professionally" - meaning I play to earn money to pay bills.
    So as a "pro" - I see myself as "the house."
    I'm there to entertain the tourists - tell stories, keep the conversation flowing.
    I'll offer to cover drinks - or use my card status to get players premium drinks... so they don't have to pay. (I once even covered a players massage after I felted him twice.)

    I'll ask before I straddle (few players ever object).
    And I'll give action to get action.
    As "the house"... I choose to allow the tourists to dictate things like chops (or straddles) if it makes them more comfortable.

    It's how I do business at the tables.
    (BTW - I'm pretty proud of having out-of-towners specifically seek me out to say "hi" when they're in town - and often ask the floor to sit at my table.)

    Goodwill goes a long way.
    If I can't stack the BB or SB by not chopping occasionally ... then I think I must be doing something wrong. One chopped hand out of hundreds played really shouldn't make a difference in your winrate.

    But like I said - to each his own.
  • kerrizorkerrizor Red Chipper Posts: 70 ✭✭
    @kagey I disagree at keeping the game friendly only because we're all there to take each others money, which for me takes the friendly out of the equation.

    I've found the exact opposite - the fact that I am there to take people's money means I need to be even more friendly than I might normally be. The people I win the most from are there to have fun, and if they aren't having fun, they'll leave (or worse, play better...)
  • alejandro galejandro g Red Chipper Posts: 13 ✭✭
    @kerrizor after thinking about this for the major part of my day I realize now how flawed my thinking was. You are absolutely right. Thank you for the honest opinion. Needless to say I will chop from now on. Lol.
  • kerrizorkerrizor Red Chipper Posts: 70 ✭✭
    On the topic of tipping.. My policy is also the "only tip if there was a flop" although I've recently pulled back to a "Only tip if there is a turn" because I started tracking my tips and realized I was donating a not insignificant amount of money (1-2BB/hour depending on how I run) to the cause. I _firmly_ believe in tipping people service industry jobs when their wages are based on tips, but our local dealers are all full hourly employees. When I play games bigger than 1/3, I tip more generously, since like the rake it has a lower impact on my cash-out results.

  • ArtArtBobartArtArtBobart Red Chipper Posts: 356 ✭✭
    I tip every time I drag a pot, even if it is just the blinds. Also I tip the same amount if I drag a $4 pot or a $500 pot. The dealers are performing a service, and in my state they only make $11 an hour base pay.
  • PondyPondy Red Chipper Posts: 150 ✭✭
    Just to see if I get this right: Do you US based guys tip for every pot that goes postflop and even for pots that don't get to see flop? Wow. I play in England and many players here don't tip at all, while others might tip here and there. But here it is perfectly normal to drag a £100 pot and not tip. And if you win a £1000 pot and don't tip, nobody will give you bad looks either, although most players would then tip £1. I know that in the US the tipping mentality is very different, but I really didn't expect that players would even consider tipping if they just win the blinds.
  • nickyblindsnickyblinds Red Chipper Posts: 33 ✭✭
    kerrizor wrote: »
    On the topic of tipping.. My policy is also the "only tip if there was a flop" although I've recently pulled back to a "Only tip if there is a turn" because I started tracking my tips and realized I was donating a not insignificant amount of money (1-2BB/hour depending on how I run) to the cause. I _firmly_ believe in tipping people service industry jobs when their wages are based on tips, but our local dealers are all full hourly employees. When I play games bigger than 1/3, I tip more generously, since like the rake it has a lower impact on my cash-out results.

    full time hourly poker dealers in my area, Phila, AC is about 6 to 8 dollars an hour. They work for tips.
  • kerrizorkerrizor Red Chipper Posts: 70 ✭✭
    full time hourly poker dealers in my area, Phila, AC is about 6 to 8 dollars an hour. They work for tips.

    Well damn, then I'd make 100% sure to tip!!
    Pondy wrote: »
    I know that in the US the tipping mentality is very different...

    Yeah, it always surprises me when I get outside of American-centric places in the EU that tipping is a surprise to people :)
  • jeffncjeffnc Red Chipper Posts: 4,716 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think basic idea is tip if there's a flop. But if preflop is complicated and somehow it ends up being folded for a significant amount of money in the pot, I'd tip. I try nowadays to take into account how long the hand takes. If I win a pot that took 5 minutes, that's $5 the dealer could have made in fast hands. I'm not tipping $5 in a $40 pot if some moron tanks, and I'm not tipping $5 in a $20 pot that takes 30 seconds, but will tip more in general for larger pots that take longer.

    I don't chop if it gets down to 6 or fewer. Otherwise I chop with a smile just to keep the atmosphere happy. Having said that, I don't have the slightest bad feeling about someone who doesn't want to chop, and if you have an advantage it's absolutely your right to play that way. That is how poker is supposed to be played, after all.
  • kageykagey Red Chipper, KINGOFTAGS Posts: 2,241 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Pondy wrote: »
    Just to see if I get this right: Do you US based guys tip for every pot that goes postflop and even for pots that don't get to see flop?
    It's very rare in the US for gratuities to be included in services rendered.
    For example, I've seen gratuities included at a sidewalk cafes in France.
    Besides - in countries like France, being a waiter or a casino dealer is a career. In the US, it's considered an "entry-level" position (like working at a fast-food restaurant) - and it often doesn't include a liveable wage nor benefits like health insurance, etc.
    (Also in the US, you can work more than one job which is illegal in countries like France.)

    It's pretty standard to tip a good dealer who keeps the action moving and the players acting in turn. Every now and then, you run into a dealer who's more interested in watching sports on the TV or the girls as they pass by. That guy, I make it a point not to tip very well... I don't want to encourage him to keep working in my poker room.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file