How are your ranges/categories broken up into Flopzilla?

Troy HTroy H Red Chipper Posts: 20 ✭✭
I just purchased Flopzilla last week, and I would like to save certain ranges.

Should I have the main categories broken up by position, and within each position have an opening range, cold calling range, 3bet range, etc.
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or

Should I just have a list of basic opening and cold calling ranges (due to me being new to it)?
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I know the basic functions of Flopzilla and how they work, but I feel if I had these set up then it would be much easier to go back and get a better feel for things and it would be more ingrained.

Comments

  • SplitSuitSplitSuit RCP Coach Posts: 3,495 -
    I setup mine based upon the PF action (since I always start by building the PF range first). Actions include 2bets (opens and isolations), calling 2bets, 3bets, calling 3bets, and 4bets. From there I organize the ranges from smallest to widest by % of hands.
    Check out my latest course - The Hand Reading Lab
  • EazzyEazzy Red Chipper Posts: 521 ✭✭✭
    For me (because I think about ranges this way) I like puting parts of a range as a group....
    That is big nonsuited boradways....SMaller non suited broadways....Suited boradways....big pairs , missle pairs, small pairs....(any break up you want.)

    Then above the the my ranges I uncheck the clear mode.....So now when I want a range I just click the different pats that I think they play...

    A player raises from mid position.....He probably plays big unsuited broaday mid and high pairs, all suited broadway, and suited aces (then I can romove a few hands he maybe does not play or whatever. )

    I find thinking of ranges consisting of a bunch of smaller ranges to be a more effective way to get a feel for how ranges interact with a flop.

    For eg...if they play all bradways....any Broadway on the flop will hit with 48 combos....just from that....(I actually think it as 4 combos of 12 and just count this as 12) .

    I do also think of sub catagories depending on what book or video I'm working with. When reading Ed Miller hand reading book, everytime he had a range I put it in (though, I did it by thinking what parts should I include)....

  • Troy HTroy H Red Chipper Posts: 20 ✭✭
    Eazzy wrote: »
    For me (because I think about ranges this way) I like puting parts of a range as a group....
    That is big nonsuited boradways....SMaller non suited broadways....Suited boradways....big pairs , missle pairs, small pairs....(any break up you want.)

    Then above the the my ranges I uncheck the clear mode.....So now when I want a range I just click the different pats that I think they play...

    A player raises from mid position.....He probably plays big unsuited broaday mid and high pairs, all suited broadway, and suited aces (then I can romove a few hands he maybe does not play or whatever. )

    I find thinking of ranges consisting of a bunch of smaller ranges to be a more effective way to get a feel for how ranges interact with a flop.

    For eg...if they play all bradways....any Broadway on the flop will hit with 48 combos....just from that....(I actually think it as 4 combos of 12 and just count this as 12) .

    I do also think of sub catagories depending on what book or video I'm working with. When reading Ed Miller hand reading book, everytime he had a range I put it in (though, I did it by thinking what parts should I include)....

    @Eazzy


    Thank you for the response! I bolded what I am curious about above.

    I actually tried to read your post Ranges Trees V.S Forest. https://forum.redchippoker.com/discussion/4146/thinking-about-ranges-trees-v-s-forest

    You say that "Sliding the bar each time you put someone on a range in Flopzilla is time consuming because you have to remember each scenario".

    Your post is hard for me to understand and I would be greatful for you to break it down for me and/or give another example.

    I'm actually beginning to read Ed Millers book Playing the Player now which is really range heavy.

    You said all Broadway cards break down into 10 types. 40 combos of suited, the rest unsuited. You then break down the combos into 12's (which I sort of understand). If a Broadway comes on the flop and they play all Broadway's then you'd count this as 12 because the odds are 25% to hit one if I understand. Where do the groups of 12's come into play when you make a decision though?

    I know that I'm going to have to put in work studying your way, but if I can find a simpler/faster way to do this in my head while at the table after putting in enough work, then that would be awesome. I am VERY interested in your method.

    Maybe you have refined your method since then or have an easier way to explain it now but as I wait for your response I will look back over your post to try to get it a little better.

    Thanks!!


  • EazzyEazzy Red Chipper Posts: 521 ✭✭✭
    edited July 18
    @Troy H If you're interested in my rule of 12, you might get a better feel from my post

    https://forum.redchippoker.com/discussion/6083/using-the-rule-of-12-to-count-combos-revisited


    "You said all Broadway cards break down into 10 types. 40 combos of suited, the rest unsuited. You then break down the combos into 12's (which I sort of understand). If a Broadway comes on the flop and they play all Broadway's then you'd count this as 12 because the odds are 25% to hit one if I understand. Where do the groups of 12's come into play when you make a decision though?"


    Your over complicating it a bit...

    (first switch from % to combos in flopzilla by hitting the tab key)


    ....if you just put all braoadways as a range in flopzilla....(nothing else) and put a flop of K 8 3 q 8 5 j 33...i.e. one broadway and 2 non broadway...flopzilla will tell you the hit top pair with 48 combos....

    Because most of combos work out to be be in the number 12 or a fraction of 12...by dividing 48 by 12 you get 4.

    For me its much easier to keep numbers like 4 3 2 6 in my mind (they add to 15 or the first two compared to the last two are 7 to 8). and the first number is about 1/4 of the total....

    but if you use 48 36, 24 72 I can't quickly add them in my head or get a feel for the ratio between the first 2 and the second 2 or the frist one too the total.

    The ratios I use when making decisions are
    top pair + (good hands),
    2nd pair type hands (bluff catchers),
    draws ....
    all other hands.

    by understanding these ratios, you can make decisions....A flop with a lot of top pair+ relative to the others is not a good barreling hand type thing......

    Hope that helps rather then confuses...



  • Troy HTroy H Red Chipper Posts: 20 ✭✭
    edited July 18
    @Eazzy

    Thank you! That makes perfect sense. At first I thought you were using percentages at first too, now I realize where your going. And yes, comparing high numbers in ratios is much harder than short, broken down, numbers!

    I will definitely play with this concept. Thanks again
  • tfaziotfazio Red Chipper Posts: 681 ✭✭✭
    A neat trick in flopzilla is you can save the openings you have created and change the name of the default file now your old ranges will be saved and you will have a blank slate to begin again if you want to go back to the original file just change the name back to default
    It is a little clunky but if you want to start over and not lose your old ranges that is the way