Request for sample answer from SplitSuit

La OnzaLa Onza Red Chipper Posts: 41 ✭✭
Hi James,
Hope that you are doing well. I'm working through your book, "Poker Workbook 6max Online Cash Games." It is great, and I thank you.

Can you post an example of a solution? I'm trying to figure out the best format to create an answer to this question. I've attached something that I created for hand #1, but I'm not overly thrilled with it. I do like the visual aspect as I like to look at a hand range .

Thank you for any insight that you might have here.

Charley

Comments

  • SplitSuitSplitSuit RCP Coach Posts: 4,081 -
    Hey Charley

    You're very welcome! So here is a sample hand+output:

    https://www.splitsuit.com/hand26

    You may also want to use my templates (free): https://www.splitsuit.com/templates

    Overall your work is in the right direction - you just need to find a way to make it easier to glance at when reviewing your work in the future imo.
    📑 Grab my custom poker spreadsheet pack right now.
    📘 Start the Preflop & Math Poker Workbook today.
  • tfaziotfazio Red Chipper Posts: 819 ✭✭✭
    @La Onza check out the hand reading Skype group Thursday nights 9 pm est Msg @derdonker to join
  • derdonkerderdonker San Jose, CA USARed Chipper Posts: 125 ✭✭
    edited September 2017
    Our hand-reading skype group meets on Thursdays at 6pm PT / 9pm ET. Msg me with your skype handle and I can include you in the group. We can go over hands in the 6max workbook and the full-ring workbook. Cheers.
  • joesizejoesize Red Chipper Posts: 119 ✭✭
    I know the workbook is for online play, but I play live cash games that, especially into the night, often winnow down to five or six players. I know some of the adjustments that are needed for short-handed games, and I have read about “risk of ruin” being the reason to loosen up. My question is about when to adjust. Is it on an indivdual hand basis, or is it for the times when you know the game is going to remain short handed? For example, there are suddenly five players at the table now, but you know that another table is going to be broken up, and that those players will be coming to the short table. You know that you aren’t at risk of being ruined by the blinds before the new players sit down. Or, does the risk of ruin only apply to tournaments? I haven’t been able to find any strategy materials for short-handed live cash games, and I have wondered about this for several years.
  • tfaziotfazio Red Chipper Posts: 819 ✭✭✭
    The hand reading workbook comes in three flavors, live, online and tournaments take your pick.
  • SplitSuitSplitSuit RCP Coach Posts: 4,081 -
    joesize wrote: »
    I know the workbook is for online play, but I play live cash games that, especially into the night, often winnow down to five or six players. I know some of the adjustments that are needed for short-handed games, and I have read about “risk of ruin” being the reason to loosen up. My question is about when to adjust. Is it on an indivdual hand basis, or is it for the times when you know the game is going to remain short handed? For example, there are suddenly five players at the table now, but you know that another table is going to be broken up, and that those players will be coming to the short table. You know that you aren’t at risk of being ruined by the blinds before the new players sit down. Or, does the risk of ruin only apply to tournaments? I haven’t been able to find any strategy materials for short-handed live cash games, and I have wondered about this for several years.

    Hey Joe,

    Risk of ruin is related to bankroll and how likely you are to blow up a bankroll. You may be confusing the term with the 'one life to live' concept in tournaments - but that's unclear.

    There are 3 different workbooks and you can learn about them all here:

    q9b62j6k4nvt.png
    📑 Grab my custom poker spreadsheet pack right now.
    📘 Start the Preflop & Math Poker Workbook today.
  • joesizejoesize Red Chipper Posts: 119 ✭✭
    Thanks,
    I got that from Harrington on Hold ‘em, in the section on the “M Factor,” and he was talking about tournament play. In cash games, I know that your range should be opened up for short-handed play, and that hands like Ax become more playable, but is that just because you will be in a late position more, and wouldn’t that be about the same mode of play as when the first three or four players fold to you on a full table? As far as I can see, the only real difference would be the absence of the “clumping” tendency at a short-handed table, where there is the slightly greater chance that the late players will be armed with more aces and kings.
    I don’t know if the online six-max workbook would help me in live cash games where the players are (presumably) less skilled and less aggressive.
    Anyhow, since I don’t yet have the Hand Reading Workbook for regular live cash games, I am going to do that first. I’ll have a lot more time to study when the cold weather hits, but I at least want to make a start at it now.

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