Taking a shot at moving up

whycandiwhycandi Red Chipper Posts: 24 ✭✭
I've been playing $1/$2 for a while and winning regularly. A few of my friends in the cardroom have suggested that I take a shot at the $2/$5 because my game can handle it. I don't have the bankroll yet to play regularly at the higher level but I have enough padding to take a few shots.

My question is, do I take my shots on a weekend night when the games are softer with more recreational players or try a mid-week spot when the table will have more regulars and thus be tougher? Ordinarily, I'd go for the softer game at the higher level, but playing the lower stakes game is pretty profitable on weekends. So, I'm torn between a soft entry at the higher level or padding my bankroll at the lower level.

And, before you say play one night at each level, I can only make it to the cardroom one weekend night because I have family commitments on the other nights.

Suggestions are welcome.

Comments

  • bigburge10bigburge10 Red Chipper Posts: 1,309 ✭✭✭✭
    Since you're taking a shot, I'd lean towards the softer field. At least at first to get comfortable with the stakes, bet sizes, etc. Maybe after a few of those sessions, you can then take on the tougher weekday crowd.

    One important thing to note--the 2/5 lineups likely won't be much different from the 1/2 lineup. It'll be a little more difficult, but not drastically. So, don't be intimidated.
  • RedRed Red Chipper Posts: 1,541 ✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2017
    I would not say that weekend poker night are softer. You may find more recreational players (than the other days), but also more gamblers, making the game more wild and high variance - but more money to take as well.
    Note that's why many pros I know make more money during the week than on on weekend.

    edit: also, if you want to progress, look to play against better players and observe them. A tougher field is also the best place to learn :)
  • Dean MDean M Red Chipper Posts: 172 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2017
    Or do as I used to do - If I doubled up early at 1/2 - jump into 2/5 and take a shot with free money.

    Every other shot I’d lose my buy in or make a nice profit at 2/5

    After a few of those you’re ready to tackle the next level
  • Dean MDean M Red Chipper Posts: 172 ✭✭✭
    Who says you’re going to lose? Be smart, pick your spots and play smart poker.

    2/5 players aren’t that much better - they’re just easier to read. :). When real money’s at stake they play more honest
  • eugeniusjreugeniusjr Red Chipper Posts: 390 ✭✭✭
    Two weeks without playing poker???
  • vandwellervandweller Red Chipper Posts: 23 ✭✭
    edited December 2017
    If you have a job, you not only do not need a bankroll, but you shouldn't have one. Your job is your bankroll. Stringent adherence to some bankroll formula when you have a job will only inhibit your progress.

    Play the highest level that meets the following criteria:

    1. You think you can beat it.
    2. You can replenish 3-5 buyins within a month or two of paychecks without hurting your life.

    Take shots at the next level when you have poker money over and above your 3-5 buyins for your primary level. If you win, stay at the new level.

    The above advice will seem volatile. But trust me. This is the way.

    P.S. Don't take this advice if the perceived volatility will upset you.

  • SplitSuitSplitSuit RCP Coach Posts: 3,909 -
    @whycandi Have you heard this podcast episode on the subject yet?

    https://redchippoker.com/moving-up-poker-tips-podcast/

    (I suggest shotting during the softer times, and either way - best of luck!)
    My latest poker course brings the popular book 'Poker's 1%' to life- The One Percent
  • SullySully Red Chipper Posts: 713 ✭✭✭
    Keep your poker day job (1/2) and moonlight the the other (2/5)

    if your making your most money at 1/2 on weekend, keep to that and shot take 2/5 during the week.

    Besides, as mentioned, regs are more predictable and will actually fold to a well constructed bluff. If that's not important and you are looking to shot take and hope to hit big hands, I would rethink the whole process
  • whycandiwhycandi Red Chipper Posts: 24 ✭✭
    SplitSuit wrote: »
    @whycandi Have you heard this podcast episode on the subject yet?

    https://redchippoker.com/moving-up-poker-tips-podcast/

    (I suggest shotting during the softer times, and either way - best of luck!)

    Thanks for the suggestion. I'll listen to the podcast today. And, I'll follow your advice and the take the weekend shot.

    By the way, I love your videos. Super helpful.
  • whycandiwhycandi Red Chipper Posts: 24 ✭✭
    Sully wrote: »
    Keep your poker day job (1/2) and moonlight the the other (2/5)

    if your making your most money at 1/2 on weekend, keep to that and shot take 2/5 during the week.

    Besides, as mentioned, regs are more predictable and will actually fold to a well constructed bluff. If that's not important and you are looking to shot take and hope to hit big hands, I would rethink the whole process

    I'll moonlight for a while or until my bankroll can stand the permanent jump.

    My understanding is that there's a lot of cross-pollination between the 1/2 and 2/5 games, so I'll stick to the game that I have. It's been working so far, and I'm not likely to switch up unless I can't beat the game. I might play a little tighter while I get the lay of the land, but I don't want to learn new tricks in a new environment.
  • whycandiwhycandi Red Chipper Posts: 24 ✭✭
    vandweller wrote: »
    If you have a job, you not only do not need a bankroll, but you shouldn't have one. Your job is your bankroll. Stringent adherence to some bankroll formula when you have a job will only inhibit your progress.

    I like to keep my poker bankroll and other income sources separate. It helps me know if I am a winning or losing player. Plus, my wife wants to know if I'm throwing away money at the poker table. Showing her the bankroll helps ease her mind. Finally, having separate accounts and paying attention to the poker bankroll forces me to get better because I want to increase the bankroll.
  • ragin_cajunragin_cajun Red Chipper Posts: 38 ✭✭


    When I moved up to 2/5, never having really watched the games closely in my poker room, I was surprised to see they were usually crappy. 10 regulars sitting at a table folding to each other for hours on end, gossiping and catching up about people they all know but I don't. VERY tight game. They all just sit around, gossip, wait for an idiot to show up and spew. I had more fun at the 1/3 games. This is probably unique to the rooms where I live (in the sticks).

    Live games in poker rooms all play a lot bigger at night than during the day. So...it's possible that, at times, your 1/2 game has been playing up to a weekday 2/5 game and you don't really realize it? That's how it is in my room (again, in the sticks).

    I'm starting to think now that using blinds to describe a live game is almost useless. The game plays according to stack sizes and player perceptions of pre-flop raise size. Those things drift around over the hours/days of a game at a table even though blind sizes stay constant. If 2/5 sucks where you play, then you might decide to try to make your 1/2 game play bigger instead of moving to a 2/5 game?

    Personally, for my own psychological reasons, I chose to sit in the boring 2/5 game during the day, get used to the players and how they bet in the 2/5 games, get them talking about hands, etc. After a few weeks, I stayed late for a wild late night 2/5 game, and I was shocked at how much more money people will OCCASSIONALLY spew in 2/5. But, only occasionally. Most of the time, the 2/5 game is like watching paint dry, or it's not running because they don't have enough people interested in playing (in the sticks).


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